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A Star of a Van: The Ford Aerostar

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Meet Ford’s first-ever minivan. A shining star if we ever did see one. Let us reminisce on the Ford Aerostar together in this used car spotlight.

A minivan wasn’t exactly on Ford’s list of things to do first. When you have a best-selling pickup, you don’t exactly put two and two together. But after years of successfully selling F-150s and Econolines, Ford was finally ready to create something that fit the growing-family mold.

Ford’s first minivan became the Aerostar and it would lead to several renditions of the model, as well as others within Ford’s lineup that we see today. While we revel in how wonderful Ford’s trucks are every day, we have decided to take a moment to rejoice in the Aerostar as many of us have ridden in one a time or two throughout our lives. It may be gone, but the Aerostar may never be forgotten.

In A Ford Galaxie Far, Far Away…

The Aerostar was the first minivan put into production by Ford, but it wasn’t the first concept. The original plot to develop a smaller van came after realizing that the Econoline vans developed by Ford wouldn’t fit in a standard American garage. To make a “garageable” van, Ford began developing the Carousel. Built on an Econoline chassis, the roofline would be 12 inches lower than the Econoline design and feature redesigned A-pillars. Many other details were discussed, and well-liked by Ford executives, but money was running tight due to the energy crisis of 1973 and funds were eventually directed to other projects instead.

Ford Aerostar on Carsforsale.com
Ford Aerostar on Carsforsale.com

A sad turn for the development of minivans stopped there.

Soon after, the famous Lee Iaccoca left Ford to join Chrysler which led to Chrysler’s development of a minivan.

When it rains, it meteor showers, right?

Ford couldn’t stand for that so they began developing their own minivan in response, which would lead to the real star.

Too many star jokes, you say? Just you wait.

Reaching for the (Aero) Stars

Ford Aerostar
Ford Aerostar on Twitter @itsvantime

The energy crisis made the Ford Carousel design an immediate no-go as motor companies were tightening their belts and designs to manufacture cars with high fuel efficiency. Ford still wanted a “garageable” van and used the Carousel design as a jumping-off point but chose to forego using Econoline and full-size truck parts when building their concept. Instead, Ford’s minivan would implement the compact Ford Ranger’s powertrain. Ford’s minivan would have its own chassis, with model-specific rear and front suspensions, which set it apart from its competitors like Chrysler and GM. After replacing some of the van’s parts with lightweight materials like plastic and aluminum, the final concept of the minivan was ready. It came to be known as the Ford Aerostar.

The Early Lightyears of the Aerostar

Like its competitors, the Aerostar was manufactured with a combination of parts from other vehicles already being produced to keep costs as low as possible. In the end, the Aerostar shared the same chassis as the Ford Ranger and Bronco II with some reinforcements to meet the towing capacity of its competitors. The Aerostar had two engine options: a 2.3L 4-cylinder and a 2.8L V6 (which later became a 3.0L V6). By 1998, only the 3.0L V6 engine remained and the Aerostar became the only van in its spectrum to be powered only by V6s.

Aerostar
Aerostar on Instagram @AutomoBear

Eventually, the Aerostar would offer an electronic 4WD system, also known as E-4WD. Though never designed for off-roading, this allowed the minivan to know when 4WD was needed without the driver’s input.

A Rocket Van: Inside and Out

With a name like Aerostar, your mind might wander to rockets and spaceships. You wouldn’t be far off as this minivan comes with a slope-nosed hood and sleek(ish) lines. On the outside, several plastic parts, the rear hatch and bumper, were used to keep the van’s weight light and aerodynamically fit. Later, Ford would extend the length of the Aerostar to compete with our longer minivans on the market, adding 14 inches to the rear end. Throughout its life, the Aerostar would see many changes in grille color, badging, headlights, and turning signals, but it would never be fully redesigned.

The interior, though not super exciting (I mean come on, it’s a minivan!), seats 7 passengers and two rows of removable seats. What’s most impressive is that the Aerostar could have up to 6 ashtrays and 2 cigar lighters. Is impressive the right word?

Trim Levels

XL and XLT

The van came in two trim levels, XL and XLT. For some extra cash, the XL trim upgrades included power windows, locks, privacy glass, and air conditioning. The XLT trim had options such as two-tone paint (wowza!), rear climate control, two different AM/FM stereo cassette players, and 14-inch aluminum wheels.

Eddie Bauer Wagon

The first of its kind minivan marketed toward the luxurious, outdoorsy types, the Eddie Bauer Wagon was priced above the XLT trim level and offered all the conveniences of the XLT. The interior was outdoor-themed with the option for leather seats. The most coveted feature of the Eddie Bauer edition was the fold-flat seats that turned into a bed.

Aerostar Sport

The Aerostar Sport wasn’t much of an upgrade, as it was purely based on aesthetics. For cool silver paint and pinstriping, as well as a different set of wheels, you could spend a little extra money to make your Aerostar stand out.

Every Star Burns Out

Even after receiving Motor Trend’s Truck of the Year Award in 1990, the Aerostar would see its final days in the early 90s. Ford began planning a new design to come after the Aerostar in 1988, which led to the production of the Windstar in 1994. At first, Ford was expecting to pull the Aerostar and only sell the Windstar starting in 1995, but that put a bad taste in the mouths of dealers. Ford decided to sell the Aerostar and Windstar together. They kept the Aerostar on the market for 2 more years before discontinuing the design. By the end of its career, the Aerostar managed to sell over 2 million vehicles in 12 years.

What do you think about the Ford Aerostar? Let us know in the comments below.

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Erin Maxson

Erin loves nothing more than a good road trip. To her, getting behind the wheel is one of the biggest adventures you can take because it can lead to anywhere. Alongside her Toyota Tundra, you'll find her co-pilot pup, Rory, and a 1976 Airstream Argosy in tow. Her motto: Life is a scenic road, take your time and enjoy the ride.

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2 Comments

  1. Avatar
    Ekim January 14, 2020

    I love my 1995 XLT.. 4.0 and 229000 miles on her and still running strong…

    Reply
    1. Carsforsale.com Team
      Carsforsale.com Team January 14, 2020

      Thanks for sharing! What color is it!?

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